How to Run Satellite & Antenna Signals on the Same Cable

by Aubrey Kerr
Connect your satellite and antenna cables to an A/B splitter to run the signals on the same cable.

Connect your satellite and antenna cables to an A/B splitter to run the signals on the same cable.

The digital signal that comes through your satellite receiver and the broadcast signal from your antenna both run through coaxial cable into your home. The satellite cable goes to your DVR or set-top-box while the antenna cable goes to your digital converter box. To combine these two signals on the same cable, you need an A/B switch. The A/B switch combines and controls the two signals so you can run both to your TV with one cable.

Connect a 1' length of coaxial cable to the "Satellite Out" connection on your DVR or satellite set-top-box. Connect the second 1' length of coaxial cable to the "TV Out" connection on your antenna's digital converter box.

Attach the free ends of the two 1' lengths of coaxial cable to the "A In" and "B In" connections on the A/B switch. It doesn't matter which cable is connected to A or B.

Run the 3' length of coaxial cable between the "TV OUT" connection on the A/B switch and the "Cable/Ant IN" connection on your television.

Slide the switch on the A/B switch from "A" to "B" to change from one signal to the other.

Tip

  • You may need different lengths of coaxial cable than that specified here to accommodate the distance between your devices.

Warning

  • Digital satellite signals and antenna signals should not run on the same cable at the same time. This causes interference and the signals won't come through properly. Always switch from one signal to the other using an A/B switch.

Items you will need

  • Coaxial A/B switch
  • 1' coaxial cable with F-connectors (2)
  • 3' coaxial cable with F-connectors (1)

About the Author

Aubrey Kerr is a writer and photographer. With a B.A. in media arts and public relations, she has helped small business owners design and implement online marketing campaigns since 2004. Her work appears on several websites including Salon.com and the Houston Chronicle.

Photo Credits

  • Stockbyte/Stockbyte/Getty Images